Texians Advancing

Texians 002

Sorry for the blurry photo, but these are the Texians in uniform coats.

Sorry for the blurry photo, but these are the Texians in uniform coats.

The volunteer in uniform coats from the rear to show the turnbacks

The volunteer in uniform coats from the rear to show the turnbacks

Most wear some combination of frock coats and slouch hats.

Most wear some combination of frock coats and slouch hats.

All 30 figures are different.

All 30 figures are different.

The two figures on the right wear hunting frocks. Next to them are volunteers wearing stove-pipe hats.

The two figures on the right wear hunting frocks. Next to them are volunteers wearing stove-pipe hats.

After a long hiatus due to circumstances beyond my control, I have returned with a few updates to my Texas War for Independence project. Today I will look at Blue Moon Manufacturing’s pack 15TRT-102 ‘Texians Advancing’, This set consists of 30 Texian volunteers dressed in the typical mix of civilian and military attire of the 1830’s. All the poses are unique. Seven figures are dressed in a long military coat with turnbacks, two men wear hunting frocks, two are in waistcoats, while the remaining figures wear frock-coats. Headgear is equally diverse with variously shaped slouch hats being the most common, three have stove-pipes, two wear forage caps similar to the contemporary U.S. Army model, and two have sombreros. Trousers and low brogans are universal and one man appears to have leggings of some description, In the case of equipment, most have a military-style cartridge box, many have powder-horns in addition, some have a water-bottle that looks like the standard U.S. Army version in use at that time. Some figures have a haversack. Most of the firearms carried are muskets, but three men have Kentucky rifles, three have double-barreled shotguns, and one man uses a flintlock pistol.

As you can see, despite my limited photographic skill, the figures are nicely detailed and up to Blue Moon Manufacturing’s high standards. Mold seams and flash were minimal to non-existent. For the great majority I only needed to carve a tiny burr off of the bottom of the base! The figures are also historically accurate and generally match what we know about the bulk of the volunteers. The uniform-style coats on a few of the figures are more the only mystery, since I can’t find a similar uniform other than later grey and blue coats with white turnbacks. But there is no reason to fret over such a small thing since not only was clothing supplied from various sources, but at least two volunteer companies were described by eye-witnesses to be dressed in uniform, but no information as to what these uniforms may have looked like has survived the 177 years between 1836 and 2013.

 

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